Хармс в анимации


29 сентября сходил на программу «Даниил Хармс в анимации» в Библиотеке киноискусства им. С. М. Эйзенштейна. Вела ее киновед Алена Сычева. Было показано четыре фильма – три российских и один чешский. В разговоре после показа участвовали авторы фильмов режиссеры Константин Голубков и Дмитрий Лазарев и продюсер Школы-студии «Шар» Любовь Гайдукова.

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Спектакль «СтарухЫ» (реж. Федор Павлов-Андреевич, Россия)

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Спектакль «СтарухЫ» (по рассказу Даниила Хармса «Старуха») мне выпало посмотреть на нынешнем «Гогольфесте» в Киеве. В моей практике театрального критика случались разные зрелища, это — из самых странных.
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Daniil Kharms. Blue Notebook No. 10

(8) The Carpenter Kushakov

Once there was a carpenter. He was called Kushakov.
One day he left his house and went off to the shop to buy some carpenter's glue.
There had been a thaw and it was very slippery on the street.
The carpenter took a few steps, slipped, fell down and cracked his forehead open.
-- Ugh! -- said the carpenter, got up, went off to the chemist's, bought a plaster and stuck it on his forehead.
But when he went out on to the street he again slipped, fell and smashed his nose.
-- Huh! -- said the carpenter, went off to the chemist's, bought a plaster and stuck the plaster over his nose.
Then he went out on to the street again, again slipped, fell and cracked open his cheek.
Once again he had to go off to the chemist's and stick a plaster over his cheek.
-- Well, then -- the chemist said to the carpenter -- you seem to fall and hurt yourself so often, that I would advise you to buy several plasters while you are at it.
-- No -- said the carpenter -- I'm not going to fall any more!
But when he went out on to the street he slipped again, fell and smashed his chin.
-- Damn these icy patches! -- exclaimed the carpenter and again ran off to the chemist's.
-- There you are, you see -- said the chemist. -- You've gone and fallen again.
-- Not at all! -- shouted the carpenter. -- I won't hear another word! Give me a plaster, and hurry up!
The chemist handed over a plaster; the carpenter stuck it on his chin and ran off home.
But at home they didn't recognize him and wouldn't let him into the flat.
-- I'm the carpenter Kushakov! -- the carpenter shouted.
-- Pull the other one! -- was the reply from the flat and they fastened the door, both with the key and with the chain.
The carpenter Kushakov stood on the staircase for a flit, spat and went off down the street.

Daniil Kharms. Blue Notebook No. 10

(7) Pushkin and Gogol

GOGOL falls out from the wings on to the stage and quietly lies there.
PUSHKIN appears on stage, stumbles over GOGOL and falls.
PUSHKIN: What the devil! Seems I've tripped over Gogol!
GOGOL (Getting up): What a vile abomination! You can't even have a rest. (Walks off, stumbles over PUSHKIN and falls) Seems I've stumbled over Pushkin!
PUSHKIN (Getting up): Not a minute's peace! (Walks off, stumbles over GOGOL and falls) What the devil! Seems I've tripped over Gogol again!
GOGOL (Getting up): Always an obstacle in everything! (Walks off, stumbles over PUSHKIN and falls) It's a vile abomination! Tripped over Pushkin again!
PUSHKIN (Getting up): Hooliganism! Sheer hooliganism! (Walks off, stumbles over GOGOL and falls) What the devil! Tripped over Gogol again!
GOGOL (Getting up): It's sheer mockery! (Walks off, stumbles over PUSHKIN and falls) Tripped over Pushkin again!
PUSHKIN (Getting up): What the devil! Well, really, what the devil! (Walks off, stumbles over GOGOL and falls) Over Gogol!
GOGOL (Getting up): Vile abomination! (Walks off, stumbles over PUSHKIN and falls) Over Pushkin!
PUSHKIN (Getting up): What the devil! (Walks off, stumbles over GOGOL and falls into the wings) Over Gogol!
GOGOL (Getting up): Vile abomination! (Walks off into wings; from offstage) Over Pushkin!
(Curtain)

(1934)


Daniil Kharms. Blue Notebook No. 10

(6) The Optical Illusion


Semyon Semyonovich, with his glasses on, looks at a pine tree and he sees: in the pine tree sits a peasant showing him his fist.
Semyon Semyonovich, with his glasses off, looks at the pine tree and sees that there is no one sitting in the pine tree.
Semyon Semyonovich, with his glasses on, looks at the pine tree and again sees that in the pine tree sits a peasant showing him his fist.
Semyon Semyonovich, with his glasses off, again sees that there is no one sitting in the pine tree.
Semyon Semyonovich, with his glasses on again, looks at the pine tree and again sees that in the pine tree sits a peasant showing him his fist.
Semyon Semyonovich doesn't wish to believe in this phenomenon and considers this phenomenon an optical illusion.

(1934)